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Check out this article from nbcnews tech department on crowdsourcing and citizen science - questionable categorization as addiction aside, the perspectives shared by volunteers and your fellow #volunpeer siobhanleachman are SPOT ON! 

We agree with this quote: “If you are doing this, you are a scientist, because you are contributing” - some folks may debate this perspective, but we think every little bit of knowledge that we can create together is powerful enough to generate discovery. You can help the Smithsonian and other institutions like the University of Iowa libraries DIY history (uispeccoll & iowawomensarchives), Yale, and Zooniverse with just a few minutes, or lines, or notes a day. 

We’re all thankful for the time you share with us and that we can continue to bring you stories, science, art, and mysteries of the universe from the pages of our collections!

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New Projects: Volunpeers be QUICK!

Good Monday to you all -

We have two BRAND NEW (in their series) Botanically themed projects up in the Transcription Center this morning - each just ripe for transcription and review. 

That’s more Croton from Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and Burpee Seeds Contest letters from smithsoniangardens and Archives of American Gardens. 

Be quick! Over the past two weeks, sets of these seed letters and Croton have been gobbled up rapidly by your fellow #volunpeers. 

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lvmdayofdead:

Meet LVM Dia de los Muertos animated iBook character Florentina! 
Watch animated short stories about the traditions and cultural practices of Dia de los Muertos told through vibrant animated characters Florentina and her wise Abuelita in our interactive iBook! Provide with support from the Walt Disney Company.
Download the  Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum Día de los Muertos/Day of the Dead interactive iBook available on iTunes U!
Download the interactive e-Book for the Teacher Toolkit featuring a Dia de los Muertos Module!
Visit our iTunes collection to explore more of our interactive educational resources!
SIGN UP to receive weekly email updates for the 2014 Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) Real/Virtual Celebration! #LVMDayofDead
Learn more about the Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum on the Latino.si.edu website and view more of our cultural and educational resources.
Connect with the Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum on Twitter and Instagram @Smithsonian_LVM and become a part of our growing online community. Follow us on Facebook!

lvmdayofdead:

Meet LVM Dia de los Muertos animated iBook character Florentina!

Watch animated short stories about the traditions and cultural practices of Dia de los Muertos told through vibrant animated characters Florentina and her wise Abuelita in our interactive iBook! Provide with support from the Walt Disney Company.

Download the  Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum Día de los Muertos/Day of the Dead interactive iBook available on iTunes U!

Download the interactive e-Book for the Teacher Toolkit featuring a Dia de los Muertos Module!

Visit our iTunes collection to explore more of our interactive educational resources!

SIGN UP to receive weekly email updates for the 2014 Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) Real/Virtual Celebration! #LVMDayofDead

Learn more about the Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum on the Latino.si.edu website and view more of our cultural and educational resources.

Connect with the Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum on Twitter and Instagram @Smithsonian_LVM and become a part of our growing online community. Follow us on Facebook!

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A bit of Friday Final Lines inspiration for our followers facing mid-terms, especially those enrolled in Physics - take first Smithsonian Secretary Joseph Henry’s advice and increase your knowledge so that “although naturally one of the weakest and most defenceless animals, (you can) become the ruler of the world." 
This project is shared by Smithsonian Institution Archives - these were Joseph Henry's first lecture notes on “Natural Philosophy” or Physics as we know it today. Henry was dedicated to increasing and instructing scientific knowledge, even before becoming the first Secretary.
Did you know that October is Archives Month? You can get firsthand experience with materials from SIA and five other archives in the Transcription Center - including archivesofamericanart and Archives of American Gardens ( smithsoniangardens ). 
We share the final lines of projects transcribed by #volunpeers like you on Fridays. Let us know if you transcribe some thought-provoking lines!

A bit of Friday Final Lines inspiration for our followers facing mid-terms, especially those enrolled in Physics - take first Smithsonian Secretary Joseph Henry’s advice and increase your knowledge so that “although naturally one of the weakest and most defenceless animals, (you can) become the ruler of the world.

This project is shared by Smithsonian Institution Archives - these were Joseph Henry's first lecture notes on “Natural Philosophy” or Physics as we know it today. Henry was dedicated to increasing and instructing scientific knowledge, even before becoming the first Secretary.

Did you know that October is Archives Month? You can get firsthand experience with materials from SIA and five other archives in the Transcription Center - including archivesofamericanart and Archives of American Gardens ( smithsoniangardens ). 

We share the final lines of projects transcribed by #volunpeers like you on Fridays. Let us know if you transcribe some thought-provoking lines!

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"What Burpee’s Seeds Have Done for Me" is the topic of conversation for this Transcribe Tuesday Two-fer!

In the Burpee Seed Contest Letters from 1924 to 1925, shared by Archives of American Gardens and smithsoniangardens, we see gardeners from all walks of life and locations around the world explaining how their love of gardening has grown.

Join us in transcribing these letters - we’re on part 4. You’ll read about the ways planting and tending to gardens united families, helped people through grief and post-traumatic stress, and produced beautiful and delicious flowers and vegetables. There are mentions of the many places these people have lived and how they took inspiration in building powerful plots.

Each week, on #TranscribeTuesday, we share work created by digital volunteers in the Transcription Center. Get in touch and let us know which project should we highlight next!

P.S. We’re even throwing in a belated #MondayMindmelter: who was Mrs. Roy E. Hipple? All we’ve been able to determine so far was that a Roy E. Hipple from Illinois was signed up for service in 1918 from DeKalb, Il.

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"Then I was young but now I’m old, But still I am observing" are fantastic Friday Final Lines. 
This project celebrating the career span of Solomon Brown is brief, completed and available for download from the Transcription Center, and shared by Smithsonian Institution Archives. Solomon G. Brown was the first African American employee of the smithsonian Institution and served in a variety of roles in his 54 year tenure. He was also an active in stewarding and building African American community and culture in the Anacostia DC area. You can learn more about Brown and his activism, poetry, and tenure at the Smithsonian Institution from these posts:
Solomon Brown at the Smithsonian
A poem for a friend
Solomon Brown: Renaissance Man

"Then I was young but now I’m old, But still I am observing" are fantastic Friday Final Lines. 

This project celebrating the career span of Solomon Brown is brief, completed and available for download from the Transcription Center, and shared by Smithsonian Institution Archives. Solomon G. Brown was the first African American employee of the smithsonian Institution and served in a variety of roles in his 54 year tenure. He was also an active in stewarding and building African American community and culture in the Anacostia DC area. You can learn more about Brown and his activism, poetry, and tenure at the Smithsonian Institution from these posts:

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smithsonianlibraries:

What could be more October-y than bats and Metal?

How about bats, Metal, and SCIENCE!?
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute postdoctoral fellow Inga Geipel is using Heavy Metal to train bats as part of her research on echolocation. I wonder if she considered any other musical genres?More about her research on Smithsonian Science.
Illustration from Die entwicklung der modernen buchkunst in Deutschland. by German painter and illustrator Thomas Theodor Heine. 

Exit LIGHT// Enter niii-iight// Take my hand// We’re off to explore SCIENCEland

smithsonianlibraries:

What could be more October-y than bats and Metal?

A fringe-lipped bat, Trachops cirrhosis (Photo: Sean Mattson/ STRI)

How about bats, Metal, and SCIENCE!?

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute postdoctoral fellow Inga Geipel is using Heavy Metal to train bats as part of her research on echolocation. 
I wonder if she considered any other musical genres?
More about her research on Smithsonian Science.

Illustration from Die entwicklung der modernen buchkunst in Deutschlandby German painter and illustrator Thomas Theodor Heine.

Exit LIGHT// Enter niii-iight// Take my hand// We’re off to explore SCIENCEland

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archivesofamericanart:

On This Day in 1862, Henry Mosler wrote about the Battle of Perryville in his diary. He wrote, “In the evening Col Blake Cotton and myself went out to view the Battlefield which was a sight that I have not the power to express we where also at the Hospital where about 200 wounded where lying suffering some crying Oh Mother Oh! Doctor Oh! give me some water, enough to make any one feel the terror of this war.”

This diary is currently on view in our exhibition "A Day in the Life: Artists’ Diaries from the Archives of American Art."

For more on Henry Mosler’s Civil War diary, visit our digital exhibition http://civilwardiary.aaa.si.edu/

Henry Mosler Civil War diary, 1862. Henry Mosler papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

The Battle of Perryville, Found October 8, 1862 by Henry Mosler

We learn so much from war diaries and the ways scenes, sights, and sounds of battle affected artists. If you’re in DC, make time to visit the archivesofamericanart exhibition. 

Relatedly, we can neither confirm nor deny that there could be some diaries coming into the Transcription Center… but if you decide to check back into the Transcription Center next week, you might be able to confirm or deny for yourself. 

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dcpubliclibrary:

Have you checked out Dig DC yet?  We launched our new portal to digitized and born-digital items from DCPL Special Collections yesterday and couldn’t be more excited about this new resource! 

There’s already a lot to explore (photos, maps, artwork, oral histories, and more!) but even more to come as we continue adding to our digital collections!

Images left to right from top: Dischord Record Flier, Eddie Janney Collection; Raymond Dorsey, Joseph Curtis Photograph Collection; Wanderlusters on Difficult Run Hike, Willard R. Ross Postcard Collection; Plate 6, Hopkins Real Estate Directory 1887, Washingtoniana Map Collection; and “The President has been criticized for leaving the White House so frequently…”, Clifford Berryman Cartoon Collection.  All images from Dig DC, DC Public Library Special Collections.

Amazing resources and chances to explore - check it out!

(via rockhalllibrary)

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smithsonian:

Time travel through deep time with smithsonianmag's Earth Interactive. You’ll see how Earth has changed over seven major period’s in its climate history and what it may look like in the future. Humans are irrevocably changing our world, driving ecological change so profound that many scientists are referring to today as a new geologic age: The Anthropocene. Or, the Age of Humans. 
Tomorrow we’re hosting a symposium where invited guests and our experts in climate change, natural history and world culture will explore the effects we’re having on our planet and what solutions we’ll need in order to adapt. You can watch the live webcast and follow along on social media at #AgeofHumans

Better than a time machine — and without snowdrifts, mammoth creatures, or floods — join @smithsonian to explore how world culture and collaborative solutions can impact climate change.

smithsonian:

Time travel through deep time with smithsonianmag's Earth Interactive. You’ll see how Earth has changed over seven major period’s in its climate history and what it may look like in the future. Humans are irrevocably changing our world, driving ecological change so profound that many scientists are referring to today as a new geologic age: The Anthropocene. Or, the Age of Humans. 

Tomorrow we’re hosting a symposium where invited guests and our experts in climate change, natural history and world culture will explore the effects we’re having on our planet and what solutions we’ll need in order to adapt. You can watch the live webcast and follow along on social media at #AgeofHumans

Better than a time machine — and without snowdrifts, mammoth creatures, or floods — join @smithsonian to explore how world culture and collaborative solutions can impact climate change.

(via preteriteblog)